The organs of Paris
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The French classical organ is the common name for the French baroque organ. It had a highly standardized stoplist, in line with its (almost exclusively) liturgical use. The music played on those organs was highly standardized too, prescribing in detail which stops had to be used (e.g Plein jeu, Basse de Trompette, Tierce en Taille). This system was still in use at the time of the revolution (end of the 18th century). Only 3 of the 23 organs which survived the revolution kept (more of less) their pre-revolutionary French- classical style. In fact, the best examples of an organ in French classical style in an excellent state can be found outside Paris: in Versailles and Aubervilliers. The table on the right site summarizes the main characteristics of the three French classical organs. It shows that most stops of the organs of Saint-Gervais and Saint- Nicolas-des-Champs date still to before the revolution. In contrast, the organ of the Salpêtrière hospital lost most of its pre-revolutionary stops.
Organs of Paris

Before the revolution -

French classical style

Only 3 of the 23 organs which survived the revolution kept more of less their pre-revolutionary French-classical style. In fact, the best examples of an organ in French classical style in an excellent state can be found at this moment outside Paris in Versailles and Aubervilliers. Chapelle l’hôpital Salpêtrière Saint-Gervais Saint-Nicolas-des-Champs Versailles (Chapelle Royale) Aubervilliers (Notre Dame des Vertus) The table below summarizes the main characteristics of the three French classical organs. It shows that most stops (40 out of 58) of the organ of Saint-Nicolas-des-Champs date still to before the revolution. In contrast, the organ of the Salpêtrière hospital lost most of its pre-revolutionary stops.
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